2020年圍繞兒童,音樂和技術的10個話題

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  • 2020年圍繞兒童,音樂和技術的10個話題

      202011/1302:19

    ◎針對了解孩子們的數位習慣以及他們對音樂的意義。研究公司(Kids Insights)也為此製作了一份報告發布。以下是10個話題(其中包含來自Kids Insights的大量統計數據和趨勢分析)。
    1.唱片公司和兒童音樂
    Universal Music與Lego建立了夥伴關係,Warner Music與Warner Music與Mattel建立了夥伴關係。WMG還為(Build-A-Bear Workshop)推出了專用唱片。同時,Sony Music UK的Magic Star品牌專注於原創兒童音樂-包括Oscar發行的第一張專輯,這是玩具零售商Smyths的動畫吉祥物。
    2. Spotify for the kids
    去年10月,Spotify軟啟動了一個兒童的獨立應用程式,如果父母是Spotify Family訂閱者,則可以使用。之後,它又提供了一些新功能,包括更多的家長控制功能。
    3. Fortnite的music moves
    說唱歌手(Travis Scott)並不製作兒童音樂,但他在《Fortnite》中的表演吸引了眾多觀眾,包括很多孩子。三天的時間裡,他的表演在不同的時區吸引了2770萬獨特的參與者。
    4. TikTok上的音樂人
    隨著TikTok的發展,藝人和唱片公司已經開始更加積極地使用它。(BTS),(Justin Bieber),(Halsey),(Maluma),(Take That),(Christina Aguilera),(Carrie Underwood)去年都加入了這一行列,(Drake)則邀請了一些傑出的舞蹈網紅來幫助他的《Toosie Slide》,這首歌在TikTok上風靡一時。
    5. Splash on Roblox
    遊戲平台Roblox擁有1.5億用戶。最有趣的遊戲之一就是Splash,其中數百萬的孩子正在使用AI製作音樂。
    6. YouTube上的Cocomelon
    Cocomelon為兒童提供動畫童謠和原創歌曲,從《Baa Baa Black Sheep》到《Bath Song》和《Yes Yes Vegetables》,如今已被兒童媒體公司Moonbug收購。
    7. Marshmello帶孩子們狂歡
    (Marshmello)創立了一個名為Mellodees的品牌,並製作了動畫原創歌曲。
    8.(Nick Cope):新星
    一定年齡的英國音樂迷可能會認識(Nick Cope),他是1990年代獨立樂團(The Candyskins)的主唱。(Nick Cope)如今開始為兒童製作音樂,今年他參與為英國學齡前電視頻道CBeebies製作的電視節目。
    9. Education, education, education
    新技術和創業公司可能會在向世界各地的孩子們教授音樂的方式中發揮作用。一家名為Solfeg·io的新創公司在6月的Midemlab競賽中獲勝。在Covid-19危機期間,它每月簽約2,000多所學校。這只是許多發明的年輕公司中的一種,他們發現了新的數位方式來幫助孩子學習演奏音樂。
    10. Yoto演講者的家庭使命
    越來越多的孩子正在使用智慧音箱,但對於不熟悉該想法的父母,還有其他選擇。英國新創公司Yoto擁有一個“精心連接的智慧音箱”,可以為孩子們播放音樂,故事,播客和廣播,而不會引起隱私問題。它的競爭對手包括Toniebox,該公司使用實體玩具代替紙牌來達到類似的效果。
    ◎根據Kids Insights研究數據:
    –英國3-12歲的人群中有17%、13-18歲有29%擁有智慧音箱
    – 6-12歲的孩子平均每天花48分鐘聽音樂
    – 17%的孩子更喜歡使用語音控制設備
    – 3-18歲的53%的人每天使用YouTube幾次
    –上個月,英國10-18歲的年輕人中有39%、270萬人使用TikTok
    – Spotify在一定程度上是英國青少年最受歡迎的串流媒體服務

    詳細內文:

    Last month, Music Ally took part in the BPI and ERA’s New Kids on the Block online event, looking at children’s digital habits and what they mean for music.
    Research company Kids Insights produced a report for the event too, which has been published today. We contributed a section on some of the interesting stories we’ve been reporting on around kids and music.
    Here are the 10 stories we picked out, with a link to download the free full report (which has bags of stats and trendspotting from Kids Insights) at the end.
    1. Labels and children’s music
    Universal Music has a partnership with Lego, and Warner Music with Mattel. WMG has also launched a dedicated label for Build-A-Bear Workshop. Meanwhile, Sony Music UK’s Magic Star label focuses on original children’s music – including the first album from Oscar, the animated mascot for toy retailer Smyths.
    2. Spotify for the kids
    Last October, Spotify soft-launched a standalone app for children, which they could access if their parents are Spotify Family subscribers. It’s one of the first attempts to envisage what a music streaming app for kids would look like, and has since got several new features, including more parental controls.
    3. Fortnite’s music moves
    Rapper Travis Scott doesn’t make ‘children’s music’ but his performance within the game Fortnite attracted a huge audience – including plenty of kids. His performance was shown five times over three days, for different time zones, and attracted 27.7 million unique participants – who could also buy Travis-branded virtual items to play with.
    4. Musicians on TikTok
    As TikTok has grown, artists and labels have started using it more actively themselves. BTS, Justin Bieber, Halsey, Maluma, Take That, Christina Aguilera and Carrie Underwood all joined in the last year, while Drake enlisted some prominent dance influencers to help his ‘Toosie Slide’ track go viral on TikTok earlier this year.
    5. Splash on Roblox
    At the time we wrote our section of the BPI/ERA report, games platform Roblox officially had more than 120 million users, but it’s since updated that figure to 150 million. One of the most interesting games from Music Ally’s perspective is Splash, where millions of children have been creating music live, using AI-generated beats and loops.
    6. Cocomelon on YouTube
    The first ever YouTube channel to do more than one billion views in a single week was a music channel, but it didn’t belong to an artist. Cocomelon offers animated nursery rhymes and original songs for kids, from ‘Baa Baa Black Sheep’ to ‘Bath Song’ and ‘Yes Yes Vegetables’. Since we wrote our section of the report, it’s been acquired by kids media firm Moonbug.
    7. Marshmello takes kids raving
    In fact, animated children’s music is huge on YouTube: when we analysed the platform’s rankings recently, we found that the top 10 nursery-rhyme channels were doing 2.7bn views a week collectively. Now one artist wants a piece of that action: Marshmello, who has launched a brand called Mellodees with animated, original songs.
    8. Nick Cope: the new kids star
    British music fans of a certain age may know Nick Cope for his role as frontman of 1990s indie band The Candyskins. But can they sing along with ‘The Baby’s Done a Poo’? That’s one of the songs from the latest phase of Cope’s career making music for kids. This year, he starred in a TV show made for UK preschool TV channel CBeebies.
    9. Education, education, education
    New technologies and startups may be able to play a role in the way music is taught to children around the world. One such startup, Solfeg·io, was a winner of the Midemlab competition in June. It’s been signing up more than 2,000 schools a month during the Covid-19 crisis. It’s just one of a number of inventive young companies finding new digital ways to help kids learn to play music.
    10. Yoto speaker’s family mission
    A growing number of children are using smart speakers, but for parents who aren’t comfortable with the idea, there are other options. British startup Yoto has a “carefully connected speaker” that delivers music, stories, podcasts and radio for kids, without causing privacy headaches. Its competitors include Toniebox, which uses physical toys instead of cards to similar effect.
    To further whet your appetite for the report, here are some of the key stats from Kids Insights’ research:
    – 17% of 3-12 year-olds and 29% of 13-18 year-olds in the UK own a smart speaker
    – 6-12 year-olds spend an average of 48 minutes a day listening to music
    – 17% of kids prefer to control their devices using voice
    – 53% of 3-18 year-olds access YouTube a few times a day
    – In the last month, 39% of 10-18 year-olds in the UK used TikTok: 2.7m people
    – Spotify is the most popular streaming service for British teenagers by some distance (see above)

     

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