DiMA的報告 讚許音樂串流媒體在美國的影響

  • 流覽次數:: 51
  • 分類: 產業區
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  • 作者: 音樂地圖
  • DiMA的報告 讚許音樂串流媒體在美國的影響

      202012/0907:30

    ◎美國數字媒體協會(DiMA)是遊說機構,為包括Amazon,Apple,Pandora,Spotify和YouTube在內的公司提供音樂串流服務。由諮詢公司(Midia Research)製作的新的“Streaming Forward”報告,著眼於串流媒體對美國音樂產業的積極影響。
    ◎報告2019年的數據表明,美國串流媒體收入為103億美元(音樂行業每天產生2820萬美元),到年底,美國串流媒體音樂訂閱量為8720萬,其中有9900萬訂閱者。這是一個有趣的數字,暗示大約11.9%的美國音樂訂戶沒有自己付費-例如,因為他們用的是家庭中其他人付費的家庭計劃。
    ◎8720萬訂閱數與美國行業協會RIAA在2019年官方公佈的6040萬付費訂閱數字不同。這是因為RIAA的統計數據是全年的平均值,而DiMA的統計數據是年底的數據。DiMA的報告還提供了截至2019年底,美國廣告支持的音樂聽眾人數的數字:將近1.17億。
    ◎其他話題包括:17%的美國音樂串流媒體用戶至少每月搜索一次歌曲歌詞;美國有21%的消費者每月收聽播客,但對於音樂訂戶和智慧音箱所有者而言,這一比例上升到40%以上;美國有47%的智慧音箱用戶為音樂訂閱付費,而總消費者中這一比例為21%;並預測美國的串流媒體收入將從2020年的117億美元增長到2026年的178億美元。

    詳細全文:

    The US-based Digital Media Association (DiMA) is the lobbying body for music streaming services from companies including Amazon, Apple, Pandora, Spotify and YouTube.
    Its new ‘Streaming Forward‘ report – produced with consultancy firm Midia Research – thus focuses on the positive aspects of streaming’s impact on the US music industry.
    Its data from 2019 notes that there were $10.3bn of streaming revenues in the US (“$28.2m per day generated for the music industry”) and that by the end of the year there were 87.2m streaming music subscriptions in the US and 99 million subscribers.
    That’s an interesting number, hinting that around 11.9% of American music subscribers aren’t paying themselves – for example because they’re on family plans paid for by someone else in their household.
    [Note, the ‘87.2m subscriptions’ figure is different from US industry body the RIAA’s official 2019 figure of 60.4m paid subscriptions. That’s because the RIAA’s stat was an average across the year, while DiMA’s is a year-end figure. DiMA’s report also offers a figure for the number of ad-supported music listeners in the US at the end of 2019: nearly 117 million.]
    More talking points: 17% of US music streaming users search for song lyrics at least every month; 21% of US consumers listen to podcasts on a monthly basis, but that rises to more than 40% for music subscribers and smart speaker owners; 47% of US smart speaker owners pay for a music subscription compared to 21% of overall consumers; and there’s a forecast that US streaming revenues will grow from $11.7bn in 2020 to $17.8bn by 2026.
    There are some obvious gaps: no mention of the appeal against the Copyright Royalty Board’s new songwriter royalty rates (all of DiMA’s members bar Apple appealed) for example. Recent complaints by musicians about streaming payouts are also swerved, with the emphasis on success stories like BTS, Tones and I and Lil Nas X.
    Here’s a fun thing though: a separate infographic created by DiMA to illustrate ‘Who gets paid and how much?’ from US on-demand audio subscription revenues, breaking down how each $100 collected from consumers is divided up.
    Not just in terms of the ‘$31 to the service and $69 to the rightsholders’ split, but beyond that too: how the $55.21 that goes to recording rightsholders and the $13.31 that goes to song [publishing] rightsholders is split between the various entities.
    These can only ever be illustrative average figures: label, publishing and management deals vary so much after all.
    But it’s very interesting to see the DSPs’ lobbying body putting an infographic out suggesting that of the $55.21 of recording royalties generated from $100 of subscription spending, labels get $43.54 (79%) while artists get $6.63 (12%). Quite the conversation starter…

     

    Musically
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